Mediation and Faith/Martin Rosenfeld, JD

I first took a course in mediation in 1995, in Chicago, IL. One of the volunteer trainers who assisted in this course, called me a number of months later. He told me about a very interesting mediation course that had a very reasonable program fee. I asked why this course was so modestly priced. I was informed that the program was under the auspices of the Mennonite group that is centered in Lombard, IL. This group, I learned, has a religious reason for trying to advance information about mediation.

The Lombard Mennonite Peace Center (LMPC) has as its religious mission the desire to encourage “nonviolent transformation” of conflict in homes, workplaces, and houses of worship. Recently I browsed the internet to learn more about the LMPC. I discovered an article that appeared in the Toledo Blade entitled “Mending Fences”. (May 28, 2016). The author, TK Barger, described a lengthy program that the LMPC offered to Midwestern faith leaders. One of the participants, Rev. Deborah Rose, summed up what she gained from the program by saying that she did not attend the program to learn how to be a mediator. This was not the purpose of the program. Rather, she wished to learn new skills that could assist her in her congregational life. Sometimes, it is good to learn a new skill, such as mediation just so one can make proper referrals to professions when such mediation is appropriate.

The purpose of this blog is not to train mediators. There are professional classes for this purpose. I wish to give the religious population a better idea of what mediation entails and relate some of its important principles. It is my hope that the information found here will assist those whose life of faith leads them to the conclusion that litigation is not the solution to all forms of conflict. There is a choice. Mediate don’t litigate.